IE 9 How-to

How to…

Delete IE 9 browsing history: Click “Tools” (either in the menu at the top left of the browser just under the URL bar, or through the gear icon at the top right, just under the close-browser X) then click “Internet Options.”  Near the center of the screen, there is a “Delete” button in the “Browsing History” section.  Click it. I usually delete the first five items (Down to “Download History”).  Deleting Passwords and Form Data does not, in most cases, make not your internet browsing more secure.  If certain kinds of malware have made it into your system, the way they can steal your personal data is by capturing your keystrokes.  So every time you type in your username or password is another opportunity for malware to commandeer your information.  Ideally, you will enter your personal information once using the Windows 7 On-Screen keyboard and then not again until necessary

Clear the IE 9 Cache: Same steps as in “Delete your browsing history” (above) but in this case, make sure the first checkbox “Preserve Favorites Website Data” is unchecked.

Clear the IE 9 Java Temp Folder: In this case, the Java Temp folder is for your entire system, not just your Internet Explorer 9 browser.  Click the Windows Icon, or Start button on at the bottom left of your screen (on your PC), then click Control Panel.  At the top right, where it says View by: Category click the word Category and select Small Icons. The options are in alphabetical order. Scroll to Java click it. Under “Temporary Internet Files”, click “Settings…” and then “Delete Files.”

Speed up browsing: If you are using the entire Web Vaccine PC Security and Performance System, click the up arrow near the bottom right of your screen to view yoursystem tray.  Double click the shield icon and open Web Vaccine.  In the menu on the left, click Configuration. Under the General tab, make sure that all of the check boxes in the Guard Settings section are checked.  These guards prevent many Internet ads from connecting to potentially unsafe external servers and uploading through your internet connection.  Even safe ads, to try to gain your attention, try to upload animated graphics that are often bigger files than the page itself.  These uploads slow down your connection, usually to display something you have little interest in.  Web Vaccine’s guards know which external servers have the habit of uploading large files and block these uploads, speeding up your browser.

Speed up browsing: If you are not using the Web Vaccine System, one way you can speed up your internet is to find out exactly what programs in your system are connecting, why they are connecting, and how to stop them.  Steps are available at Removing Programs from StartUp.  You may also check the explanations and recommendations available at our article: Causes of Slow Internet.

View a Website’s Markup (Code): In Internet Explorer, click the F12 key, or click “Tools” (either in the menu at the top left of the browser just under the URL bar, or through the gear icon at the top right, just under the close-browser X) then click “F12 Developer Options.” For most sites, the code is displayed under the “Scripts” tab.  Keep in mind, however, that what you are seeing is the html and some CSS that your browser has retrieved to construct a page.  Many sites are actually “coded” with php, javascript, C#, or another programming language, and this code acts like instructions — explaining to your browser what to retrieve and from where to retrieve it,  so the html you see is only the product of your browser following the coded instructions that it reads almost instantaneously when it accesses a web page.  In these cases, you can’t see the actual code.  What you are seeing is just the markup (html) and styling instructions (CSS) that your browser found in a site database based on the coded directions it received initially.

View Embedded YouTube Videos: If you are receiving an error in IE9 when trying to view YouTube videos embedded in a website, try clicking “Tools” (either in the menu at the top left of the browser just under the URL bar, or through the gear icon at the top right, just under the close-browser X) then click Internet Options. Select the Advanced tab, and click in the first checkbox “Use software rendering instead of GPU rendering.” Click and copy the page URL and then close out of all IE browsers. Re-open the browser and paste the URL in the URL bar and return to the page.

Allow Images to Display in Gmail: If Gmail freezes up in Internet Explorer 9 every time you click Display images below, Software rendering, as in the procedure above, helps correct this problem also. Click “Tools” (either in the menu at the top left of the browser just under the URL bar, or through the gear icon at the top right, just under the close-browser X) then click Internet Options. Select the Advanced tab, and click in the first checkbox “Use software rendering instead of GPU rendering.” For senders from whom you receive email often, choose “Always Display images from…” near the top of the email, then reload Gmail.  IE 9 and Gmail don’t get along very well, so you may occasionally still experience issues, but these steps should minimize them.

Delete Internet Explorer 9: Click Start (or the bottom left Windows icon) then Control PanelView Installed Updates (under Programs and Features).  Select the program by clicking it, then click Uninstall at the top.   If this doesn’t work, you can try the Fix It feature available on Microsoft’s website, but apparently this might roll you back to an earlier version of IE.  If all of this fails, you can try clicking the folder icon in your tool bar, then Local Disk C: > Program Files.  Click the Internet Explorer folder once to select it and click delete (yes, you’re sure).  Then empty your Recycle Bin.  You’ll then have to do the same thing in the Program Files (x86) folder if you’re still running a 32 bit system.  This isn’t a great way to uninstall, and inoperable components will remain — floating around in your system, but the program will be mostly gone. 

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Security software for the Windows Operating System. Based in Ohio, U.S.
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